Last edited by Kazralmaran
Saturday, May 16, 2020 | History

4 edition of Some strategic implications of the nuclear revolution. found in the catalog.

Some strategic implications of the nuclear revolution.

Bernard Brodie

Some strategic implications of the nuclear revolution.

by Bernard Brodie

  • 325 Want to read
  • 38 Currently reading

Published by University of Utah Press in [Salt Lake City? .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Nuclear warfare,
  • Strategy

  • Edition Notes

    Cover title.

    SeriesInternational study paper,, no. 1
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsUF767 .B737
    The Physical Object
    Pagination12 p.
    Number of Pages12
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL5966351M
    LC Control Number65064298

    nals and seeking nuclear superiority; and for competing hard for allies and strategic territory in the developing world. They (and others) attributed this behavior to the failure of policymakers to appreciate the implications of the nuclear revolution. Jervis, for example, titled his book. The Illogic of American Nuclear Strategy. Jervis, The Meaning of the Nuclear Revolution, p. Two of the most important works on the theory of the nuclear revolution are Kenneth N. Waltz, “Nuclear Myths and Political Realities,” American Political Science Review, Vol. 84, No. 3 (September ), pp. –; and Jervis, The Meaning of Cited by:

      Unknown to the Americans, the Soviets had brought some tactical nuclear weapons to Cuba — 80 nuclear-armed front cruise missiles (FKRs), . The Nuclear Revolution and the Common Defense Robert Jervis analyzes the implications of the nuclear revolution for the United States and other superpowers' ability to defend their national security. He addresses the paradox that while the United States is more powerful militarily than the Founding Fathers could have imagined, the U.S. is nevertheless unable to provide a secure defense against.

      Robert Jervis argues here that the possibility of nuclear war has created a revolution in military strategy and international relations. He examines how the potential for nuclear Armageddon has changed the meaning of war, the psychology of statesmanship, and the formulation of military policy by the superpowers/5. Here, Jervis (Poli. Sci./Columbia) charts a heavily studied area—nuclear politics—from an unusual perspective. Eschewing the straight historical approach of John Newhouse's War and Peace in the Nuclear Age () or the philosophic approach of Joseph Nye's Nuclear Ethics (), Jervis goes to the heart of the matter—demonstrating how nuclear weapons have created a revolution in military.


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Some strategic implications of the nuclear revolution by Bernard Brodie Download PDF EPUB FB2

Additional Physical Format: Online version: Brodie, Bernard, Some strategic implications of the nuclear revolution.

[Salt Lake City?] [University of Utah Press], [?]. The theory of nuclear revolution also failed to explain leaders’ fear of proliferation. If nuclear weapons were great for deterrence but lousy for battle, then Washington should have been sanguine as new countries went nuclear. It might even have been optimistic, since proliferation would, under the theory, lead countries to become cautious.

Rethinking the “nuclear revolution” we might as well save some money and move to Some strategic implications of the nuclear revolution. book "minimum deterrence" posture, like this. And by acknowledging that nuclear weapons are neither the be-all. The second general implication of the nuclear revolution is that a major war cannot end in military victory.

This seems obvious to most nonexperts, but in fact is quite controversial. Only a few experts believe that "the Soviet Union thinks it could fight and win a nuclear war."5 While the Russians do appear to. The nuclear-revolution school argues that the bomb severely constrains and limits — and at times eliminates — the grand-strategic choices that were available to states and statesmen in the past.

The nuclear revolution should have had important consequences for proliferation dynamics, nonproliferation policies, and alliances. "A nuclear war cannot be won and must never be fought." So Ronald Reagan and Mikhail Gorbachev affirmed, and so most people believe.

The starting point of this masterful book by one of America's preeminent strategists, however, is that while the proposition is accepted, its deeper implications are not grasped. What the nuclear revolution has done is magnify in force and compress in time. called nuclear revolution: nuclear proliferation, the risk of nuclear terrorism, the nuclear taboo, missile defence, and the increased it may seem to be for some states.

Once a nuclear weapon has been in the literature in a slightly different meaning by Barry Buzan in his book An Introduction to Strategic Studies (London: Macmillan to worry about enemy nuclear attack. However, conditions changed with the passing years, but the first sharp public reminder that we had an important 6.

Col. Richard L. Curl, "Strategic Doctrine in the Nuclear Age," Strategic Review (U.S. Stra-tegic Institute, Washington, D.C.), Winterp. Nuclear strategy, the formation of tenets and strategies for producing and using nuclear weapons.

Nuclear strategy is no different from any other form of military strategy in that it involves relating military means to political ends. In this case, however, the military means in question are so. Some may criticize the book because it does not concentrate on certain issues relevant today, such as non-proliferation or nuclear terrorism.

From the perspective ofthough, Freedman's work serves as a history of the major strategic discourse of the Cold War.4/5(12). The nuclear revolution and the problem of credibility This chapter elaborates a framework within which to place the more detailed and narrowly focused analyses of the subsequent chapters.

That framework encompasses the broader themes that will connect the more specific issues examined in later chapters. This chapter develops theFile Size: 1MB. The Meaning of the Nuclear Revolution in the 21st Century. The Meaning of the Nuclear Revolution was published just as fears of a nuclear war between the superpowers began to recede.

In the s and early s, nuclear concerns migrated to “rogue states” like Iran and North Korea, as well as the acquisition of nuclear weapons by terrorist.

Strategic Implications Of A Nuclear-armed Iran by Kori N. Schake (Author), Judith Share Yaphe (Author) ISBN ISBN Why is ISBN important.

ISBN. This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version or edition of a book. Format: Plastic Comb. The review extols ambiguity and proposes two new low-yield nuclear capabilities to “expand the range of credible U.S.

options for responding to nuclear or non-nuclear strategic attack” (p. 55). The Trump NPR diverges from the Obama NPR on declaratory policy in still other ways. South Asia's Nuclear Strategy, by Bhumitra Chakma (Book Review) there exist two schools of thought on the implications of nuclear revolution.

The some sections of the book do seem : Bibek Chand. @article{osti_, title = {Morality and the bomb. An ethical and strategic assessment}, author = {Fisher, D.}, abstractNote = {The advent of nuclear weapons has necessitated a Copernican revolution in thinking about war. Giving the great destructiveness of nuclear weapons, could.

Get this from a library. Nuclear threats from small states. [Jerome H Kahan; Army War College (U.S.). Strategic Studies Institute.] -- That are the policy implications regarding proliferation and counterproliferation of nuclear weapons among Third World states. How does deterrence operate outside the parameters of superpower.

Strategy - Strategy - Strategy in the age of nuclear weapons: The period from to represented the acme of the old style of war, and with it strategy as the purposeful practice of matching military might with political objectives. In its aftermath a number of challenges to this classical paradigm of war emerged, the first in the closing days of World War II.

The revival of nuclear strategy in US policy and scholarship has been strengthened by arguments that the ‘nuclear revolution’ – the assumption that thermonuclear bombs and missiles had made major war too dangerous to wage – does not affect international behaviour as much as Cited by: 3.

A strategic nuclear weapon refers to a nuclear weapon which is designed to be used on targets often in settled territory far from the battlefield as part of a strategic plan, such as military bases, military command centers, arms industries, transportation, economic, and energy infrastructure, and heavily populated areas such as cities and towns, which often contain such targets.

Soviet Strategic Culture: Implications for Limited Nuclear Operations,”2 Jack Snyder poked at the soft underbelly of American nuclear strategy: the assumption that the Soviet military shared America’s understanding of nuclear weapons. Snyder made it clear that, as they had.The Nuclear Revolution in Strategic Affairs “To compress a catastrophic war within the.

span of time that a man can stay awake. drastically changes the politics of war, the. process of decision, the possibility of central. control and restraint, the motivations of. people in File Size: KB. From the perspective ofthough, Freedman's work serves as a history of the major strategic discourse of the Cold War.

In a way, his work serves as a the cap on fifty years of writings on nuclear students of strategy, _The Evolution of Nuclear Strategy_ is an essential read.5/5(1).